Web services facilitate application-to-application integration and interoperability across different platforms. However, critics usually point to an inefficient processing model and bandwidth requirements for developing Web services. This is often cited as a reason why Web services can...
A service-oriented architecture (SOA) is the design blueprint for seamless connectivity between business processes and IT infrastructure, enabling innovation and improving productivity. SOA provides the most efficient, standard way to dynamically interoperate with any customer, supplie...
Replacing complex, monolithic applications with nimble applications built from exposed services promises increased developer productivity, greater flexibility, and ultimately reduced cost. The adoption of Web services and SOA can also remove a significant level of complexity and integr...
IT leaders are hoping to leverage the benefits inherent in Web services and Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA) to enable their businesses to be far more competitive and to find new operational efficiencies. But, can we depend on these new technologies and approaches? Management and s...
Service-oriented architecture (SOA) represents the opportunity to achieve broad-scale interoperability, while providing the flexibility required to continually adapt technology to business requirements. No small feat, particularly when one considers the extent and complexity of today's...
In the past year, Web services and service-oriented architectures (SOAs) have become mainstream because of their ability to provide business agility and flexibility through integration, productivity, and reuse. With SOA enablement on the rise, IT groups must address SOA governance as a...
One of the great benefits of a service-oriented architecture is the ability it gives you to extend programmatic integration capabilities to business partners. Going beyond simple sharing of data with partners, SOA enables true B2B application integration. At the same time, this capabil...
Too often today the preferences, terms, and conditions describing how a Web service behaves when discovered and invoked is programmed right into the business logic. Hard-coding this behavior logic however introduces cost, complexity, and rigidity into a Web services architecture. A bet...
Web services are gaining industry-wide acceptance and usage and are moving from proof-of-concept deployments to actual usage in mission-critical enterprise applications. Web services range from major services such as storage management and customer relationship management to much more ...
Most businesses store and query data with relational databases but need to use Extensible Markup Language (XML) to exchange and display data on the Web and with vendors and partners. As a result, programmers need to deal with both relational and XML data, often at the same time. Emergi...
Implementing service oriented architecture (SOA) for Fortune 50 corporations takes more than a hit-or-miss approach. This presentation will provide attendees with insights into a practical, lessons-learned approach to the implementation of an SOA architecture through a short examinatio...
Web services and service-oriented architectures (SOAs) are emerging as an integral part of the enterprise IT strategy. According to a recent IDC study, Web services-related revenue is expected to triple from $1.1 billion worldwide in 2003, to $3.4 billion in 2004, and $16.6 billion by ...
Despite the open industry standards that underlie Web services, interoperability has been a key challenge for vendors and customers implementing Web services. One reason for this is that the relevant industry standards often permit multiple acceptable implementation alternatives. This ...


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